Each week we post an Order of Service for the upcoming Lord’s Day worship service. It gives a preview of the sermon content and explains how each element of the service supports the theme of the message. We carefully select songs for the teaching value of the lyrics (Colossians 3:16). Use the links in each post to preview the lyrics of the songs. Please read Understanding Worship at HBC for an explanation of the contribution made by each element of the service.

Check this page each week.

Order of Service, September 6, 2020

Introduction Luke laid four stories from the life of Jesus side-by-side in chapter eight. They drive us to ask, with Jesus’ disciples and opponents alike, “Who is this?” In each of these four stories, Jesus intervenes to save people in helpless distress and, in so doing, he demonstrates his power over nature, demons, disease, and…

Order of Service, August 30, 2020

Introduction Luke 8:26-39 records an encounter Jesus had with a man possessed and abused by demonic forces. Several important themes are woven throughout the story. The demoniac serves as living parable of the tragic human condition. The story also points us to Jesus who alone wields power sufficient to overcome evil. Particularly instructive is the…

Order of Service, August 23, 2020

Introduction The sermon text for this Lord’s Day (Luke 8:22-25) records a miracle through which Jesus displays his authority over the created order. The disciples are left trembling at the display of unimaginable power and asking “Who is this?!” The hymns selected for the service celebrate Jesus’ absolute authority and the divine King and the…

Order of Service, August 16, 2020

Introduction The sermon text for this Lord’s Day contains a startling account of Jesus’s interaction with his own family (Luke 8:19-21). He declared, “My mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it.” The unmistakable point of the paragraph is that a relationship with Jesus is the most important…

Order of Service, August 9, 2020

Introduction The theme of light runs through the sermon text for this Lord’s Day (Luke 8:16-18). Light is a metaphor for truth. The truth mentioned in our text has God as its source and Jesus as both its messenger and subject. Jesus called his hearers to listen carefully to his message because it brings both…

Order of Service, August 2, 2020

Introduction People often suggest that Jesus told parables to illustrate the truths he taught. But Jesus, himself, explains in the sermon text for this Lord’s Day that he did not intend for his parables to illumine truth; rather, they concealed the truth. Only those whom the Lord calls into Jesus’ Kingdom will understand it and…

Order of Service, July 26, 2020

Introduction Luke 7:36-50 tells the story of a woman who put her love for Jesus on public display. She received from him the forgiveness of sins that comes through faith. Consequently, her great love for him overflowed like an artesian well. The hymns in our worship service express our offerings of love for the salvation…

Order of Service, July 19, 2020

Introduction The sermon text for this Lord’s Day (Luke 7:18-35), Jesus responds to questions about his identity. He contrasts those who refuse to trust him with those who do. The conclusion of the passage displays this great truth: Jesus is God’s promised Messiah; those who trust him are wise. The hymn for this service express…

Order of Service, July 12, 2020

Introduction The sermon text for this Lord’s Day (Luke 7:11-17) tells the story of a miracle unique to the Gospel of Luke. The central point of the story appears in v. 16, “A great prophet has arisen among us.” The Old Testament predicted that God would raise up the ultimate prophet who would speak for…

Order of Service, July 5, 2020

Introduction In our sermon text for this Lord’s Day (Luke 7:1-10), we encounter a “wonderful” faith in an unexpected person: a Roman centurion. Several important themes are woven into the story. It foreshadows the universal scope of the gospel message. It enlarges the picture of Christ’s mighty power. It stresses our unworthiness to approach Christ.…